Injection Safety

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MDHHS Viral Hepatitis Unit Webinars

Introduction

Welcome to the webinar series on preventing Health Care Associated Viral Hepatitis Infections. This series is designed to provide a review of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommendations for injection safety and safe assisted diabetes care. This module includes some basic information regarding Hepatitis B and C outbreak investigations and Injection practices within Michigan based healthcare facilities.

Please send feedback, questions, and/or comments to the MDHHS Viral Hepatitis Unit at MDHHS-Hepatitis@michigan.gov

 

 

Injection Preparation and Administration

This module provides a brief review of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommendations for safe injection practices.  It includes information on hand hygiene, vial handling and needle and syringe use. 

Injection Preparation Supplemental Information Sheet

For more injection safety information visit www.cdc.gov/injectionsafety

 

Three Simple Rules for Safe Diabetes Care

This module provides a quick review of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommendations for assisted blood glucose monitoring and insulin administration. 

Three Simple Rules Supplemental Information Sheet


For information about safe diabetes care, visit www.ONEandONLYcampaign.org or www.michigan.gov/hepatitis

Fingerstick Lancing Device 60 Second Check

 

Protect Yourself Protect Your Patients

This module is designed to provide a brief review of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Advisory Committee for Immunization Practices (ACIP) Hepatitis B vaccination recommendations and cleaning, disinfection and sterilization practice standards in healthcare settings.

Protect Yourself Protect Your Patients Supplemental Information Sheet


For more information visit:

Don’t Become The Headline: Addressing Drug Diversion

This module is designed to provide an overview of drug diversion prevention for health care facilities. This module includes information on commonly diverted drugs, risk associated with diversion and basics for developing a drug diversion prevention program.

Addressing Drug Diversion Supplemental Information Sheet

For more information visit:

 

Guard Your Meds: Developing a Drug Diversion Program

This module is designed to provide an overview of drug diversion prevention methods for health care facilities. This module includes tips for developing a drug diversion prevention program.

Guard Your Meds Supplemental Information Sheet

For more information visit:  

 

Sustaining Results over Time: Policy Development & Monitoring Improvements

This module provides tips for improving infection prevention activities to avoid health care associated infections.  It includes information on developing workplace culture, environment of care assessment and policy considerations.

Sustaining Results Supplemental Information Sheet

For more information visit:

MDHHS Viral Hepatitis HAI Reports

Injection and Assisted Blood Glucose Monitoring Practices in Ambulatory Surgical Centers Summary Report, 2014

Injection and Assisted Blood Glucose Monitoring Practices in Long Term Care Facilities Summary Report, 2015


CDC One and Only Campaign

Healthcare Provider Brochure

Dangerous Misconceptions (Injection Safety Myths and Truths)

Key Standards for Pain Clinics
 

Check Your Steps! Make Every Injection Safe

The One & Only Campaign urges healthcare providers to recognize the differences between single-dose vials and multi-dose vials, and to understand appropriate uses of each container type. This information can save lives.



 

Safe Injection Practices-How to Do It Right

This video focuses on the story of "Joe", a man who acquired an infection due to unsafe injection practices. It also focuses on the greater implications of Joe's infection and the importance in following infection control best practices to keep patients safe in healthcare settings.



Managing Patient Safety, One Injection at a Time

Infections are costly. Patients' lives, your accreditation status, your certification, and your licenses are all at stake. The One & Only Campaign, a public health effort to eliminate unsafe medical injections, created this short video to help you make healthcare safer, one injection at a time.



Blood Glucose Monitoring and Insulin Administration

Recommended Practices for Blood Glucose Monitoring and Insulin Administration: Preventing Blood Borne Pathogen Transmission

Fingerstick Devices

  • Restrict use of fingerstick devices to individual persons. Fingerstick devices should never be used for more than one person.
  • Auto-disabling single-use fingerstick devices should be used for assisted monitoring of blood glucose.  
    • Select single-use lancets that permanently retract upon puncture. This adds an extra layer of safety for the patient and the provider.
  • Dispose of used lancets at the point of use in an approved sharps container. Never reuse lancets.

Fingerstick Lancing Device 60 Second Check

Blood Glucose Monitoring

  • Whenever possible, blood glucose meters should be assigned to an individual person and not be shared.
    • If blood glucose meters must be shared, the device should be cleaned and disinfected after every use, per manufacturer’s instructions, to prevent carry-over of blood and infectious agents. If the manufacturer does not specify how the device should be cleaned and disinfected then it should not be shared.
  • Wear gloves during blood glucose monitoring and during any other procedure that involves potential exposure to blood or body fluids.
    • Change gloves between patient contacts. Change gloves that have touched potentially blood-contaminated objects or fingerstick wounds before touching clean surfaces. Discard gloves in appropriate receptacles.
    • Perform hand hygiene immediately after removal of gloves and before touching other medical supplies intended for use on other persons.

Insulin Pen Recommendations:

  • Insulin pens and other injection equipment are meant to be used on one person only.
  • Insulin pens should never be used for more than one person, even when the needle is changed or when there is leftover medicine.
  • Insulin pens and other injection equipment should be clearly labeled with the person's name or other identifying information to ensure that the correct pen is used only on the correct person.
  • Hospitals and other facilities should review their policies and educate their staff regarding safe use of insulin pens and similar devices.
  • If reuse is identified, patients should be promptly notified and offered appropriate follow-up including bloodborne pathogen testing.

Insulin Pen Safety 60 Second Check

Insulin Pen Safety Poster

Insulin Pen Safety Brochure

Be aware, don't share

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